The Final Wireless Transmissions aboard the R.M.S. Titanic

Manned by John George Phillips and Harold Bride, the Titanic’s wireless room had been doing steady business since the ship had left port. The machine went down on Saturday evening, April 13th, and had not been repaired until nearly 5.00 a.m., Sunday, April 14th.

Prior to April 14th, 1912, the Titanic had recieved several ice warnings, from the ships ‘Caronia’, ‘La Touraine’, ‘Amerika’, and ‘Rappahannock’. The message from the ‘Caronia’ had been posted in the officer’s chart room. Wireless operator Harold Bride shut down the telegraph for a while on April 14th, 1912 to let the machine cool, and missed an ice warning from the ‘Californian’.

While these are not every wireless message to go from or to the Titanic, they are the most pertinent to the tragedy which befell the ship:

1.40 p.m.

14 April 1912

S.S. Baltic to R.M.S. Titanic:

“Captain Smith, Titanic. Have had moderate variable winds and clear fine weather since leaving. Greek steamer Athinai reports passing icebergs and large quantity of field ice today in latitude 41.51 N, longitude 49.52 W. Last night we spoke (with) German oil tanker Deutschland, Stettin to Philadelphia, not under control, short of coal; latitude 40.42 N, longitude 55.11 W. Wishes to be reported to New York and other steamers. Wish you and “Titanic” all success”.

7.30 p.m.

14 April 1912

S.S. Antillian to R.M.S. Titanic:

“6.30 p.m., apparent time, ship; latitude 42.3 N, longitude 49.9 W. Three large bergs five mile to southward of us”.

9.30 p.m.

14 April 1912

S.S. Mesaba to R.M.S. Titanic and All Eastbound Ships:

“Ice report: In latitude 42 N to 41.25 N, longitude 49 W to 50.3 W. Saw much heavy pack ice and great number of large icebergs, also field ice. Weather good, clear”.

9.35 p.m.

14 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to S.S. Mesaba:

“Recieved, thanks”.

9.38 p.m.

14 April 1912

S.S. Mesaba to R.M.S. Titanic:

“Stand by”.

(Stanley Adams, on the S.S. ‘Mesaba’, was waiting for the Titanic to indicate the message had been given to the captain. Jack Phillips did not respond, but continued to send passenger messages to Cape Race.)

11.00 p.m. (approx)

14 April 1912

R.M.S. Californian to R.M.S. Titanic:

“Say, old man, we are stopped and surrounded by ice”.

11.10 p.m. (approx)

14 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to R.M.S. Californian:

Keep out! Shut up, shut up! I am busy, I am working Cape Race.

11.15 p.m. (approx)

14 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to Cape Race, Newfoundland:

“Sorry, please repeat. Jammed”.

Between 11.35 and 11.45 p.m. (most likely the latter) Captain Smith informed Phillips and Bride that the ship had hit an iceberg, and to prepare a distress call. The captain returned at 12.15 a.m. and told them to send it.

12.15 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to Any Ship:

“CQD Titanic 41.44 N 50.24 W”

(CQD was the contemporary distress signal, though soon, the new distress signal would be put to use for the very first time).

12.17 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to Any Ship:

“CQD CQD SOS Titanic Position 41.44 N 50.24 W. Require immediate assistance. Come at once. We struck an iceberg. Sinking”.

(SOS was the first use of the new distress signal. So far, two ships had responded to the Titanic’s distress call. They included the ‘Frankfurt’, nearly 170 miles away, and the ‘Olympic’, nearly 500 miles away.)

12.20 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to R.M.S. Carpathia:

“Come at once. We have struck a berg. It’s a CQD, old man. Position 41.46 N 50.14 W”

12.21 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Carpathia to R.M.S. Titanic:

“I say old man, do you know there is a batch of mesages coming through for you from MCC (MCC indicated Cape Cod) ?”

12.22 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to R.M.S. Carpathia:

“CQD CQD”

12.25 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Carpathia to R.M.S. Titanic:

“Shall I tell my captain? Do you require assistance?”

12.26 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to R.M.S. Carpathia:

“Yes, come quick!”

12.32 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Carpathia to R.M.S. Titanic:

“Putting about and heading for you”.

12.40 a.m.

15 April 1912

R.M.S. Titanic to R.M.S. Carpathia:

“SOS Titanic sinking by the head. We are about all down. Sinking. . .”

From 12.40 a.m. until the final message was sent from the Titanic sometime between

2.15 a.m. and 2.25 a.m. the Titanic, the ‘Carpathia’ and other ships kept a steady stream of messages, updating their progress and Titanic’s condition.

The Titanic continued to send out general CQD and SOS messages, in the chance that there might be a closer ship.

12.45 a.m.

15 April 1912

Titanic calls ‘Olympic’, (sister ship – 500 miles away en route to England) “SOS” (first use of SOS by Titanic – Bride jokingly suggests to Phillips that it may be his last chance to use the new distress call).

12.50 a.m.

15 April 1912

Titanic calls CQD and says, “I require immediate assistance. Position 41.46 N. 50.14 W.” Received by ‘Celtic’.

12.53 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Caronia’ to MBC (‘Baltic’), “MGY (Titanic) CQD in 41.46 N. 40.14 W. Wants immediate assistance”.

1.00 a.m.

15 April 1912

MGY (Titanic) gives distress signal. DDC (‘Cincinatti’) replies. MGY’s (Titanic) position 41.46 N. 50.14 W. Assistance from DDC (‘Cincinatti’) not necessary as MKC (‘Olympic’) shortly afterwards answers distress call.

1.00 a.m.

15 April 1912

Titanic replies to ‘Olympic’ and gives her position as 41.46 N. 50.14 W., and says, “We have struck an iceberg”.

1.02 a.m.

15 April 1912

Titanic calls ‘Asian’ and said, “Want immediate assistance”. ‘Asian’ answered at once and received Titanic’s position as 41.46 N. 50.14 W., which was immediately taken to the bridge. Captain Smith instructs operator to have Titanic’s position repeated.

1.02 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Virginian’ calls Titanic but gets no response. Cape Race tells ‘Virginian’ to report to his Captain that the Titanic has struck iceberg and requires immediate assistance.

1.10 a.m.

15 April 1912

Titanic to MKC (‘Olympic’), “We are in collision with berg. Sinking Head down. 41.46 N. 50.14 W. Come soon as possible”.

1.10 a.m.

15 April 1912

Titanic to MKC (‘Olympic’), Captain says, “Get your boats ready. What is your position?”

1.15 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Baltic’ to ‘Caronia’, “Please tell Titanic we are making towards her”.

1.20 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Virginian’ hears MCE (Cape Race) inform MGY (Titanic) “That we are going to her assistance. Our position 170 miles N. of Titanic”.

1.25 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Caronia’ tells Titanic, “Baltic coming to your assistance”.

1.27 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Olympic’ sends position to Titanic, “1.24 a.m. G.M.T. 40.52 N. 61.18 W”, and asks “Are you steering southerly to meet us?” Titanic replies, “We are putting the women off in the boats”.

1.30 a.m.

15 April 1912

Titanic tells ‘Olympic’, “We are putting passengers off in small boats.” “Women and children in boats, can not last much longer”.

1.35 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Olympic’ asks Titanic what weather she had. Titanic replies, “Clear and calm”.

1.35 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Baltic’ hears Titanic say, “Engine room getting flooded.” (Captain Smith had just visited the Titanic’s radio room and advised this to Phillips and Bride).

1.35 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Mount Temple’ hears DFT (‘Frankfurt’) ask, “Are there any boats around you already?” No reply.

1.37 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Baltic’ tells Titanic, “We are rushing to you”.

1.40 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Olympic’ to Titanic, “Am lighting up all possible boilers as fast as (we) can”.

1.40 a.m.

15 April 1912

Cape Race says to ‘Virginia’, “Please tell your Captain this: “The ‘Olympic’ is making all speed for Titanic, but her (‘Olympic’s') position is 40.32 N. 61.18 W. You are much nearer to Titanic. The Titanic is already putting women off in the boats, and she says the weather there is calm and clear. The ‘Olympic’ is the only ship we have heard say, “Going to the assistance of the Titanic. The others must be a long way from the Titanic”.

1.45 a.m.

15 April 1912

Last signals heard from Titanic by ‘Carpathia’, “Come as quickly as possible old man: our engine-room is filling up to the boilers”.

1.45 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Mount Temple’ hears ‘Frankfurt’ calling Titanic. No reply.

1.47 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Caronia’ hears Titanic though signals unreadable still.

1.48 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Asian’ heard Titanic call SOS. ‘Asian’ answers Titanic but receives no answer.

DFT (‘Frankfurt’) calls Titanic and says, “What is the matter with u ?”

1.50 a.m.

15 April 1912

Titanic says to ‘Frankfurt’, “You are a fool, stdbi – stdbi – stdbi and keep out”.

‘Caronia’ hears ‘Frankfurt’ working to Titanic. ‘Frankfurt’ according to position 172 miles from MGY (Titanic) at time first SOS sent out.

1.55 a.m.

15 April 1912

Cape Race says to ‘Virginian’, “We have not heard Titanic for about half an hour. Her power may be gone”.

2.00 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Virginia’ hears Titanic calling very faintly, her power being greatly reduced.

2.10 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Virginian’ hears 2 V’s signalled faintly in spark similar to Titanic’s (Phillips adjusting his transmitter to compensate for the dying power supply from the engine room).

2.17 a.m.

15 April 1912

Virginian hears Titanic, call “CQ” (call to all ships) , but unable to read him. Titanic’s signals end very abruptly as power suddenly switched off.

(Phillips had actually intended to send “CQD DE MGY”, however at this point there is a loss of all power to the radio room – water can be heard flooding the wheelhouse – Phillips says to Bride “Come on, let’s clear out”. Bride climbs to the roof of the officer’s quarters and assist with launching collapsible Lifeboat B – Phillips disappears aft).

Sometime between 2.15 a.m. and 2.25 a.m.

15 April 1912

The final wireless message sent from the Titanic:

R.M.S. Titanic to R.M.S. Carpathia:

“SOS SOS CQD CQD Titanic. We are sinking fast. Passengers are being put into boats. Titanic.”

Bride and Phillips left the wireless room after that message, after being urged to leave their post by Captain Smith. They made their way to the Boat-Deck and began trying to help the other men in the releasing of collapsible Lifeboat B. While neither of them immediately made it onto a lifeboat, both were rescued from the sea. Bride’s feet were so severely frozen he could not walk. Phillips died of hypothermia on or near Collapsible lifeboat B, his body was never recovered.

2.17 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Virginian’ called Titanic and suggested he should try emergency set, but heard no response.

2.20 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Virginian’ to ‘Olympic’, “Have you heard anything about Titanic?” ‘Olympic’ says, “No. Keeping strict watch, but hear nothing more from Titanic. No reply from her”.

2.20 a.m. (approx)

15 April 1912

This was the official time the Titanic foundered in 41.46 N. 50.14 W. as given by the ‘Carpathia’ in message to the ‘Olympic’.

Between 2.20 a.m. and 9.00 a.m. April 15th, the ‘Carpathia’ and the other ships kept a steady stream of messages, updating their progress to reach the Titanic’s last known position in order to rescue the survivors of the sinking in that “Fateful Night”.

2.35 a.m.

15 April 1912

Mount Temple hears MPA (‘Carpathia’) send, “If you are there we are firing rockets”.

2.40 a.m.

15 April 1912

MPA (‘Carpathia’) calling MGY (Titanic).

2.58 a.m.

15 April 1912

SBA (‘Birma’) thinks she hears Titanic so sends, “Steaming full speed for you. Shall arrive you 6.00 in morning. Hope you are safe. We are only 50 miles now”.

3.00 a.m.

15 April 1912

MPA (‘Carpathia’) calling MGY (Titanic).

3.28 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘La Provence’ to ‘Celtic’, “Nobody has heard the Titanic for about 2 hours”.

4.24 a.m.

15 April 1912

SBA (‘Birma’) says, “We are 30 miles S.W. off Titanic”.

6.40 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Parisian’ hears weak signals from MPA (‘Carpathia’) or some station saying Titanic struck iceberg. ‘Carpathia’ has passengers from lifeboats.

6.40 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Asian’, with German oil tank in tow for Halifax asked what news of MGY (Titanic). Sends service (message) later saying heard MGY (Titanic) V. faint working.

7.40 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Mount Temple’ hears MPA (‘Carpathia’) report rescued lifeboats.

8.07 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Baltic’ sends following to ‘Carpathia’, “Can I be of any assistance to you as regards taking some of the passengers from you? Will be in position about 4.30 p.m. Let me know if you alter your position”.

8.10 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Baltic’ in communication with MPA (‘Carpathia’), “Exchanged traffic re passengers, and get instructions to proceed to Liverpool”.

8.15 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Baltic’ turns round for Liverpool, having steamed 134 miles W. towards Titanic.

8.40 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Mount Temple’ hears MPA (‘Carpathia’) call “CQ” (message to all ships) and say, “No need to std. Bi (stand by) him. Advise my Captain (sic), who has been cruising round the icefield with no result. Ship reversed”.

8.45 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Olympic’ sent MSG (message) to Owners, New York via Sable Island saying, “Have not communicated with Titanic since midnight”.

8.55 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Carpathia’ replies to ‘Baltic’, “Am proceeding to Halifax or New York full speed. You had better proceed to Liverpool. Have about 700 passengers on board”.

9.00 a.m.

15 April 1912

‘Carpathia’ to ‘Virginian’, “We are leaving here with all on board about 700 passengers. Please return to your Northern course”.

The ‘Carpathia’ is now heading for New York where she will arrive at 9.00 p.m. on the evening of April 18th with aboard the 705 survivors.

Note:

Apparently the SOS sent by the Titanic was also picked up by a radio ham (Mr. Moore) at Gelligroes, near Blackwood Monmouthshire , who reported hearing the SOS to the local police who were sceptical at the time.

Mr. Guglielmo Marconi himself visited Gelligroes to see the radio equipment Mr. Moore had made. Mr. Moore then worked for many years for Mr. Marconi.

Mr. Moor’s relatives still live in the area. and the radio equipment can still be seen at Gelligroes Mill.

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2 Responses to “The Final Wireless Transmissions aboard the R.M.S. Titanic”

  1. Katrina Hutton says:

    Who can I speak to regarding the crew list which is incorrect and I would like to give information. Kind regards

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About This Site

This website relates to the story of the Titanic. The Grand Ocean liner sank during its maiden journey on April 15, 1912. The death toll was 1523 of the 2228 passengers and crew members aboard. There were only 705 that survived. But there is more to the story of the Titanic than just the sinking. There is the connection people feel when they open their hearts to the event. Then there is also the Children of the Titanic, the people that are related to a person aboard the ship. In all reality anyone that feels connected in there heart to the Titanic somehow can be called a "Child of the Titanic". So on that note! Welcome to the site!

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